Planet DMC

News and tidbits from the travel industry

Category: Wired (Page 1 of 10)

Melting Ski Resorts Have a Snow Machine Problem

Skiing was once an activity born of necessity—an efficient means of transport in snowy lands. Today, people ski for sport, fun, and fitness. But the Earth’s atmosphere has changed, turning once snowy slopes into muddy wastelands. As a result of global heating, the Earth no longer produces snow with the same regularity, so ski resorts are being forced to manufacture it instead.Chris Baraniuk (Wired)

The Tech-Obsessed, Hyper-Experimental Restaurant of the Future

Chefs and restaurateurs in cities across the US struggle mightily with razor-thin margins, staffing issues, minimum wage, and maximum rent. Here in Seattle, unless you’re a hot new thing or a name-brand chef with a handful of spinoff restaurants, keeping seats full can be the most soul crushing part of the daily battle to stay in business. Rivera has cultivated a whole new software-driven business model at Addo that allows him to sidestep most of these worries. While he’s at it, he’s also rethinking the idea that restaurants should serve the same food from the same menu every night.Joe Ray (Wired)

Inside Airbnb’s ‘Guerrilla War’ Against Local Governments

… about the wars you’re fighting, gee, that looks like fun!Žiga Sancin

Hilarious Images of Bored Tourists From Around the World

Since the advent of the smartphone and social media, our expectations of a holiday are being challenged more than ever. Along with our need to record what we are doing while we’re traveling is the fact that with our smartphones we have a constant stream of entertainment to draw us away from our ‘real life’ experiences.Laurence Stephens

Airbnb Wants to Find a Home in China

China is littered with the virtual carcasses of startups that attempted to do business in the country and then gave up or were shut out. These companies often discover the Chinese market is hard to understand. A few entrenched technology players dominate nearly every business. The government tends to create a regulatory environment that favors domestic companies. And the rules change arbitrarily with little warning.Jessi Hempel (Wired)

The Airbnb Challenger You’ve Never Heard of (by Name)

Fogel is spending money to change the awareness gap. Online travel aggregators, or OTAs, as Booking and its peers are known, are among the biggest digital advertisers. The vast majority of Booking’s ad spending goes to highly targeted search and banner ads, but last year the company upped spending on awareness-raising TV ads for Booking. It also created a marketing program called the “Book It List” to promote its most unusual listings, like a treehouse, a lighthouse, and a South Carolina shrimp boat. To drive attention to the listings, the company offered contests and pricey stays in rare, exclusive accommodations, like the farm featured in the movie Field of Dreams.Erin Griffith (Wired)

Airbus Is Making Beds for Economy Fliers—in the Cargo Hold

Airbus is going to start offering its airline customers the option of bunk beds, in the cargo hold. They could be rented to passengers looking for a space to nap. […] Airbus says they’ll be aimed at economy-class passengers, who would still have to spend takeoff and landing in a regular seat—the sort that’s been through extensive crash testing. But during a flight, fliers could rent a bunk, presumably for less than the price of a lie-flat business-class seat, and get some proper rest.Jack Stewart (Wired)

Ski Resorts Fight Climate Change With Snow Guns and Buses

Until recently, Alta and other western resorts didn’t have to rely on snowmaking. But that’s changed. The resort has doubled its capacity in the past decade, although it finishes snowmaking by January, Olivos says. The resort paints snowmaking machines and water lines in camouflage colors to hide them from customers who are expecting a verdant scene of spruce trees and white powder in the winter, or wildflowers in the summer.Eric Niiler (Wired)

Looking for a Smart City? Grab Your Skis

Ski resorts aren’t just smart already—they have been for a while. They’re experts at tracking skiers and snowboarders alike in an effort to make them really enjoy their winter vacation, and come back very soon. Cities wanting to get savvier about data collection might want to listen up.Aarian Marshall (Wired)

Grab Is Giving Uber a Run for Its Money in Southeast Asia

It’s clear that Uber’s one-size-fits-all app, even when customized for local markets, has had to play catch-up with Grab’s app, which reveals a more sophisticated understanding of the needs of drivers and riders, in countries like The Philippines and Vietnam. When Grab first launched, it had to teach drivers in many of its markets how to use smartphones. The company held sessions every two weeks to train them to use the app. Most riders didn’t have credit cards, so from the very start, Grab accepted cash. It took Uber two years to begin accepting cash in some parts of the region.Jessi Hempel (Wired)

Page 1 of 10

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén