Planet DMC

News and tidbits from the travel industry

Category: Wired Page 1 of 10

Thousands of Planes Are Flying Empty and No One Can Stop Them

Aviation analysts are split on the scale of the ghost flight problem. Some believe the issue has been overhyped and is likely not more prevalent than the few airlines that have admitted to operating them. Others say there are likely tens of thousands of such flights operating—with their carriers declining to say anything because of the PR blowback.Chris Stokel-Walker (Wired)

As Travel Rebounds, Airlines Are Figuring It Out on the Fly

All of the history, all of the old practices that airlines used to follow to decide what was scheduled to fly and what prices to charge, had to be thrown out the window.Jim Barlow (Amadeus)

The History of Food Photos, From Still Lifes to Brunch ‘Grams

It’s absolutely about identity, whether that’s personal, cultural, or political.Susan Bright

Melting Ski Resorts Have a Snow Machine Problem

Skiing was once an activity born of necessity—an efficient means of transport in snowy lands. Today, people ski for sport, fun, and fitness. But the Earth’s atmosphere has changed, turning once snowy slopes into muddy wastelands. As a result of global heating, the Earth no longer produces snow with the same regularity, so ski resorts are being forced to manufacture it instead.Chris Baraniuk (Wired)

The Tech-Obsessed, Hyper-Experimental Restaurant of the Future

Chefs and restaurateurs in cities across the US struggle mightily with razor-thin margins, staffing issues, minimum wage, and maximum rent. Here in Seattle, unless you’re a hot new thing or a name-brand chef with a handful of spinoff restaurants, keeping seats full can be the most soul crushing part of the daily battle to stay in business. Rivera has cultivated a whole new software-driven business model at Addo that allows him to sidestep most of these worries. While he’s at it, he’s also rethinking the idea that restaurants should serve the same food from the same menu every night.Joe Ray (Wired)

Inside Airbnb’s ‘Guerrilla War’ Against Local Governments

… about the wars you’re fighting, gee, that looks like fun!Žiga Sancin

Hilarious Images of Bored Tourists From Around the World

Since the advent of the smartphone and social media, our expectations of a holiday are being challenged more than ever. Along with our need to record what we are doing while we’re traveling is the fact that with our smartphones we have a constant stream of entertainment to draw us away from our ‘real life’ experiences.Laurence Stephens

Airbnb Wants to Find a Home in China

China is littered with the virtual carcasses of startups that attempted to do business in the country and then gave up or were shut out. These companies often discover the Chinese market is hard to understand. A few entrenched technology players dominate nearly every business. The government tends to create a regulatory environment that favors domestic companies. And the rules change arbitrarily with little warning.Jessi Hempel (Wired)

The Airbnb Challenger You’ve Never Heard of (by Name)

Fogel is spending money to change the awareness gap. Online travel aggregators, or OTAs, as Booking and its peers are known, are among the biggest digital advertisers. The vast majority of Booking’s ad spending goes to highly targeted search and banner ads, but last year the company upped spending on awareness-raising TV ads for Booking. It also created a marketing program called the “Book It List” to promote its most unusual listings, like a treehouse, a lighthouse, and a South Carolina shrimp boat. To drive attention to the listings, the company offered contests and pricey stays in rare, exclusive accommodations, like the farm featured in the movie Field of Dreams.Erin Griffith (Wired)

Airbus Is Making Beds for Economy Fliers—in the Cargo Hold

Airbus is going to start offering its airline customers the option of bunk beds, in the cargo hold. They could be rented to passengers looking for a space to nap. […] Airbus says they’ll be aimed at economy-class passengers, who would still have to spend takeoff and landing in a regular seat—the sort that’s been through extensive crash testing. But during a flight, fliers could rent a bunk, presumably for less than the price of a lie-flat business-class seat, and get some proper rest.Jack Stewart (Wired)

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